Posts tagged with "Achievement"

Sight vs. Vision

by Lex Gillette

These two things wrestle with one another constantly.

Sight absorbs the visual elements of this world.
Vision unveils a world that can exist.

Sight reveals boundaries in our path.
Vision sees beyond boundaries.

Sight shows you what you do not have.
Vision gives hope to weary eyes.

 

Sight is present.
Vision is future.

The distinction between the two has been a crucial part of my journey. One that started with the loss of my sight and the revelation of my vision.

I can remember those last days when I could still see. I would follow my mom out of the doctor’s office sobbing with uncertainty and the unsettled feelings that lay within. I couldn’t quite understand what the doctor’s diagnosis was, but the tone of his voice revealed that it wasn’t good news.

With each visit, I would be asked to read the letters on the vision chart, and each time, it became harder to see. Eventually, I couldn’t make out the letters anymore.

In the visits to follow, the doctor would shine a light in my eyes and ask that I let him know when the light was on or off. Eventually, it became a challenge to even do that. I felt it coming. I knew I would have to live my life without sight.

Are you going to lean toward what you can see now, or what you see for the future?

As challenging as it was, losing my sight turned out to be a big blessing. It forced me to cultivate a vision of hope. A vision that was fed by my mom’s tireless push to give me agency and make my own way in life.

I could no longer read printed books, but my mom found someone to teach me braille. I could no longer see to walk by myself unassisted. My mom found a specialist to help me use a mobility cane. You know, the white ones with the red tip?

These two new skills, these new ways of gaining sight, changed how I thought about the future, how I viewed the future to be, and what it meant to be blind.

Now, I understood that I could graduate from school. I had a way to do the work. I could walk down the hallways at school. I could get on and off the school bus unassisted. I could navigate the mall on my own. The absence of physical sight was replaced by a vision of hope.

I began to lean toward what I saw for the future, and I began to understand that vision had no limitations.

Vision

What You See and What You Want

I know it’s a challenge at times. Something looks pleasing to the eyes, or sounds too good to be true, and you want it. You want it right then and there. Just reaching out and grabbing it, you can satisfy that immediate need.

Ultimately, a vision is even more appealing. A realized vision is a culmination of hope, work, sweat, and commitment. People inherently know that the fruits of that labor are much sweeter than instant gratification. However, many never achieve these goals, because they can’t keep that fulfilled vision in their minds while they do the work.

How many times have you walked into your room and flipped on the light switch? Probably more than you can count. It’s easy. Eyesight reveals the switch, and you turn it on.

You’re benefiting from a vision cultivated by Thomas Edison. He refused to allow the sight of failure after heart-breaking failure to overpower his vision. He had hundreds of near misses. It took him thousands of attempts to get it right, but we now have light bulbs because of his unwavering commitment.

Sight shows us what is.
Vision shows us what can be.

I invite you to close your eyes; remove yourself from the images in front of you. Open your mind and envision yourself as you travel through a space of endless possibilities, and no boundaries. Where are you going?

The duel between sight and vision will endure. You will have to decide what you want. Just remember, it’s not always what you see now that matters most.

___________

Lex Gillette is a professional keynote speaker, 4x Paralympic Medalist, and 4x Long Jump World Champion who is currently training to win gold at the 2020 Tokyo Paralympic Games. He has been wowing audiences of all sizes with his athletic gift since 2004, and he has been inspiring audiences on the corporate stage since 2013. His ultimate goal is to teach others to look past their current reality and challenge them to see further than they ever thought possible.


Photo credits: Close up of Lex in goggles by Joe Kusumoto. Eyes closed on the starting blocks by Alex Ingram, Art is Being.

FIND YOUR WINGS

by Lex Gillette

One of my first jobs was as a DJ for a local radio station back in North Carolina. I was one of the youngest people to ever get on the airwaves. I was around 10 years old or so, and my 12-year-old cousin, Calvin, also known in our family as Chubby, was my co-host.

We played all the top hip-hop and R&B hits from artists like Boyz II Men, Notorious BIG, 112, Outkast, Mariah Carey, and Snoop Dogg. We even had prize packs for callers who would ring in to answer music trivia. With all this activity, we had to have commercial breaks to pay the bills, but we did our best to keep those short so we wouldn’t lose listeners.

It’s funny how two young kids could take on this type of job. Well, we weren’t technically employed. We weren’t even being broadcast anywhere, but you couldn’t tell us any different. We had an old tape player, some blank cassette tapes, and we would record our favorite songs from the radio.

If you grew up in the 90s, you probably know about tape players. You press the two buttons together and the machine would record. In between our recorded songs, Chubby and I cracked jokes or pretended to be callers dialing in for music trivia. To us, we were the best voices on the air. Talk about good times. Imagination is bliss.

A great imagination allows you to go places and do things without limits or expectations. At the time, Chubby and I were probably doing something that most people wouldn’t expect. Our imaginations ran wild.

You have no idea of what is possible until you allow imagination to take the reins. As we get older, most people begin to move away from imagination. “Why indulge in something that isn’t real?” they ask. “That’s not realistic,” they add. “You’re dreaming,” they say, swatting away your imagination with the palm of their hand.

To those naysayers, I’d like to say, “That’s right. Chubby and I were dreaming big.”

My years of being a DJ did so much for me. It fostered my love of music. It gave me time with my older cousin. It fed my confidence, gave me a stage, and let me know I could craft my imagination into something real.

Imagination colors the experiences of our everyday lives, but it also gives us the vision for change and innovation. I’d loved to have been the person who thought:

  • “Hey, this tape machine is big and bulky. How about we think of an option that is smaller that can produce the same outcome?”
  • “Hey, this cassette tape is only 60 minutes long. How about we figure out an option that extends our recording time?”
  • Or better yet, “Hey, let’s figure out a way to get our radio show from the cassette tape onto the computer.”

(If I had figured that last one out, I would have been invited to give my TED Talk ten years earlier!)

I understand there are many, many moments when we need to think realistically. However, the realm of non-reality reintroduces us to a land where imagination is the spoken language and creativity is currency.

Muhammad Ali once said, “The man who has no imagination has no wings.” It’s okay to step away from reality and bask in the rays of imagination. To move forward and redefine the possible, you need to spend some time in your imagination. That is where ideas are born. That is where you find your wings.

You can go places and do things no one would expect. Just cling to imagination. Now fly!

___________

Lex Gillette is a professional keynote speaker, 4x Paralympic Medalist, and 4x Long Jump World Champion who is currently training to win gold at the 2020 Tokyo Paralympic Games. He has been wowing audiences of all sizes with his athletic gift since 2004, and he has been inspiring audiences on the corporate stage since 2013. His ultimate goal is to teach others to look past their current reality and challenge them to see further than they ever thought possible.


Photo credit: Lex with arms spread by by Alex Ingram, Art is Being.

YOU DECIDE AND NO ONE ELSE

by Lex Gillette

During the lead up to the 2016 Rio Paralympic Games, my mom and I were fortunate enough to be one of the main stars for Procter and Gamble’s Strong campaign. In the 60­-second TV commercial, viewers were taken through my life’s journey, experiencing every twist and turn as I went from sight loss to top-level competitor for Team USA.

The beautiful thing about this is that my mom narrates the commercial. I’m biased. (Hey, it IS my mom!) But I must say that her vocal variety was absolutely flawless. At one point in the TV spot, you hear her say, “Elexis, it does not matter what anyone says. You decide what you can do and no one else.”

You may think it’s a cliché but think about it. How many times have we allowed another person’s words to rule over our life? How many times have we let another person’s opinions validate us? How many times have we given someone else permission to make decisions on our behalf?

We must step away from giving others the power to validate us. The same people you allow to build you up will be the same ones who can tear you down. That very statement spoken by my mom is a compass that continues to guide my life daily.

There have been times in the past when I caught wind of outsiders questioning how a high school teacher could allow a blind student to run down a narrow runway and hurl himself through the air.

Yeah, at first, I thought it was crazy too. But I began to believe in my abilities even when the rest of the world didn’t. With every stride down the runway, and every jump into the sand pit, I realized my mom was right. I decide what I can do, and no one else.

What are you battling right now?

Whose inaccurate opinions are keeping you from leveling up in life?
I dare you to go after that job that someone said you could never get.

Were you told you’re not athletic at all?
I dare you to go out for that sports team anyway.

What do you mean you’ll never find a solution to the problem?
Just because someone tells you this, doesn’t make it true.

I dare you to live your life boldly and unapologetically. I challenge you to pursue your vision with everything in your being, and never stop until it has been achieved.

In the pursuit of your vision, remember my mom’s words. “It does not matter what anyone says. You decide what you can do, and no one else.”

___________

Lex Gillette is a professional keynote speaker, 4x Paralympic Medalist, and 4x Long Jump World Champion who is currently training to win gold at the 2020 Tokyo Paralympic Games. He has been wowing audiences of all sizes with his athletic gift since 2004, and he has been inspiring audiences on the corporate stage since 2013. His ultimate goal is to teach others to look past their current reality and challenge them to see further than they ever thought possible.


Photo credit: Lex jumping by Joe Kusumoto.

OF COURSE PEOPLE WHO ARE BLIND CAN HIKE!

Do you remember the first time you went hiking? Was it an easy trail, or one of the harder ones? Did you have to be very careful of loose rocks under your feet? Did you have to climb steep hills? Hiking can be challenging. Now, imagine yourself going on a hike without the ability to see. You’re blind. However, you have the verbal assistance of an AIRA agent to help you navigate along the path.

If you were wondering, AIRA is a company that uses smart glasses or your phone’s camera to provide verbal feedback on your surroundings. So, with the press of a button on my phone, I can be connected to a human agent who then has the ability to see where I am through the smart glasses or phone camera. That agent can then provide me with verbal feedback that helps me achieve virtually any task. On this day, I wanted to go on a hike on San Miguel Ranch, so I hit up AIRA, informed my agent on what I was wanting to do, and the next thing you know, we were on our way.

With the help of my agent Windell, I was able to climb over large rocks, lunge up steep hills, and weave back and forth along the trail. Although Windell’s voice was coming through my phone, I still felt as though he was right there with me as I climbed higher and higher up the mountain. Eventually, a flag came into view. I was almost to the top. I could feel it! After a few more paces, I stretched out my cane and tapped it against the flag pole. I did it! Here’s a six minute video of my journey up Mount San Miguel.

That is just one of the things that AIRA can help the blind and visually impaired community achieve. You can call up an agent and get help with reading your mail, going grocery shopping, exploring a museum, or playing corn hole. Do you want to take pictures that can be used on your social media platforms? AIRA agents can take screen shots and save them to your profile that can then be shared with others. The possibilities are endless! Here’s the thing, whenever I step onto the podium at a major competition, there’s a certain feeling that moves through my body. It’s a feeling of achievement, knowing that I accomplished the goal that I had in mind. That’s the same feeling I received when I made it to the top of that mountain. We all can’t be athletes, but we all can feel that sense of achievement. Our environment may change, but the feeling remains the same. Set out to conquer a task and see how amazing it feels to prevail, to accomplish, to achieve. It’s a feeling that you will want to experience over, and over, and over again. I promise you!