Posts tagged with "inspiration"

How to Deliver When It Matters Most

By Lex Gillette

Be a rockYou’ve heard the phrase before, “Say what you’ll do and do what you say.” This is how you become reliable. When you’re reliable you can be trusted. When you can be trusted, people believe that you will deliver when it counts.

There’s a common sports phrase, “clutch time.” It means that when time is of the essence, and the game is on the line, you need someone to produce results. Outside of sports, you still want to foster that reputation for getting it done and avoiding the “unreliable” crown. Here are three things that will help you establish your reputation as reliable and trustworthy.

Be 100% sure you can deliver

Think about this. You plant a bunch of apple seeds in the soil. You water and care for them. A tree springs up from the ground and grows. Eventually, you walk outside to pluck one of the fruits only to realize that there are oranges hanging from the tree limbs, not apples.

That’s crazy! We should be able to trust an apple seed. It has one purpose: to fulfill the promise that when we put it into the ground, it will eventually bear apples for us to eat.

You need to be 100% sure you can deliver on what you promise.

For example, let me ask:

  • Knowing that you promised friends you would go to the movies with them that night, would you tell your co-workers that you’d stay late and help complete a project due the next morning?
  • Would you tell your boss you will write up a new proposal by close of business that day knowing that you have to pick up a family member at the airport at 3 PM?
  • Would you promise your partner a date night knowing that your rec league soccer game ends just a few minutes before you’re supposed to pick them up?

Your answer for all of these should be a resounding “No.” Particularly if you want your partner to stay your partner. (Sheesh! Do you have a death wish?)

Listen, don’t make promises you can’t keep. People expect you to produce the fruit you say you will bear.

Say “No”

Honestly, I feel like I’m coaching myself right now. I have a very hard time saying no.

If you’re like me, we get into these moments where anything seems possible. We really, sincerely want to help and say yes to everything.

  • Yes, I can help you do that.
  • Sure, I’ll meet you for coffee.
  • I absolutely have time to help you get that done.

Nine times out of ten, any single one of these requests is a small thing. But we say yes to so much that our schedules get weighed down with the promises we’ve made. We feel the stress of getting things done for other people as well as the stress to accomplish our own tasks.

Repeat after me – “No.”
Felt good, didn’t it?

It’s okay to say no. If you walk away from this post with no other insight, please remember to use this word. It will save both you and the person you’ve made promises to.

You’re saved because you’re not stressed or in a time crunch from the additional items that overwhelm your workload. They’re saved from your inability to put in the appropriate amount of time and effort required to satisfy your promise.

Saying no doesn’t always mean never. It can mean not yet. Circle back to the people who seek your help or offer them another time to check in with you. At a later date or time, you may be able to give a confident yes.

When you’re 100% sure you can deliver, you give your complete attention to the task and their needs. Saying no when you can’t do something will reflect far more positively on you than saying yes. Use the word.

Be honest

If you can’t do it, say so. Often people want to be everything to everybody. That’s just not possible. Nobody can be a master of all. I’ve tried. (See section on saying “No.”)

In my experience, you’ll be far more appreciated if you can stand there and say:

  • “I can’t help you because I know nothing about calculus.”
  • “I’m really not comfortable talking to you about those things, and I don’t want to be a part of that conversation.”
  • “I appreciate what you’re trying to do. But I don’t have the bandwidth to help right now, and I don’t know when I will.”

Some say that honesty is the best policy, but I heard Dr. Myles Munroe say, “Honesty is the only policy.” He contends that if you say, “the best policy,” you’re implying there are other options to choose from.

There is no better option when you’re faced with a request for help. Choose to be honest. Honesty can never undermine trust.

Don’t promise things that you can’t deliver, learn to say no, and be honest. If you follow these three rules, you will put forth your best effort in any aid you offer. That means you’ll have people calling on you because they know you’re reliable, trusted, and can deliver when it matters most.

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Lex Gillette is a professional keynote speaker, 4x Paralympic Medalist, and 3x Long Jump World Champion who is currently training to win gold at the 2020 Tokyo Paralympic Games. He has been wowing audiences of all sizes with his athletic gift since 2004, and he has been inspiring audiences on the corporate stage since 2013. His ultimate goal is to teach others to look past their current reality and challenge them to see further than they ever thought possible.

FIND YOUR WINGS

by Lex Gillette

One of my first jobs was as a DJ for a local radio station back in North Carolina. I was one of the youngest people to ever get on the airwaves. I was around 10 years old or so, and my 12-year-old cousin, Calvin, also known in our family as Chubby, was my co-host.

We played all the top hip-hop and R&B hits from artists like Boyz II Men, Notorious BIG, 112, Outkast, Mariah Carey, and Snoop Dogg. We even had prize packs for callers who would ring in to answer music trivia. With all this activity, we had to have commercial breaks to pay the bills, but we did our best to keep those short so we wouldn’t lose listeners.

It’s funny how two young kids could take on this type of job. Well, we weren’t technically employed. We weren’t even being broadcast anywhere, but you couldn’t tell us any different. We had an old tape player, some blank cassette tapes, and we would record our favorite songs from the radio.

If you grew up in the 90s, you probably know about tape players. You press the two buttons together and the machine would record. In between our recorded songs, Chubby and I cracked jokes or pretended to be callers dialing in for music trivia. To us, we were the best voices on the air. Talk about good times. Imagination is bliss.

A great imagination allows you to go places and do things without limits or expectations. At the time, Chubby and I were probably doing something that most people wouldn’t expect. Our imaginations ran wild.

You have no idea of what is possible until you allow imagination to take the reins. As we get older, most people begin to move away from imagination. “Why indulge in something that isn’t real?” they ask. “That’s not realistic,” they add. “You’re dreaming,” they say, swatting away your imagination with the palm of their hand.

To those naysayers, I’d like to say, “That’s right. Chubby and I were dreaming big.”

My years of being a DJ did so much for me. It fostered my love of music. It gave me time with my older cousin. It fed my confidence, gave me a stage, and let me know I could craft my imagination into something real.

Imagination colors the experiences of our everyday lives, but it also gives us the vision for change and innovation. I’d loved to have been the person who thought:

  • “Hey, this tape machine is big and bulky. How about we think of an option that is smaller that can produce the same outcome?”
  • “Hey, this cassette tape is only 60 minutes long. How about we figure out an option that extends our recording time?”
  • Or better yet, “Hey, let’s figure out a way to get our radio show from the cassette tape onto the computer.”

(If I had figured that last one out, I would have been invited to give my TED Talk ten years earlier!)

I understand there are many, many moments when we need to think realistically. However, the realm of non-reality reintroduces us to a land where imagination is the spoken language and creativity is currency.

Muhammad Ali once said, “The man who has no imagination has no wings.” It’s okay to step away from reality and bask in the rays of imagination. To move forward and redefine the possible, you need to spend some time in your imagination. That is where ideas are born. That is where you find your wings.

You can go places and do things no one would expect. Just cling to imagination. Now fly!

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Lex Gillette is a professional keynote speaker, 4x Paralympic Medalist, and 3x Long Jump World Champion who is currently training to win gold at the 2020 Tokyo Paralympic Games. He has been wowing audiences of all sizes with his athletic gift since 2004, and he has been inspiring audiences on the corporate stage since 2013. His ultimate goal is to teach others to look past their current reality and challenge them to see further than they ever thought possible.

YOU DECIDE AND NO ONE ELSE

by Lex Gillette

During the lead up to the 2016 Rio Paralympic Games, my mom and I were fortunate enough to be one of the main stars for Procter and Gamble’s Strong campaign. In the 60­-second TV commercial, viewers were taken through my life’s journey, experiencing every twist and turn as I went from sight loss to top-level competitor for Team USA.

The beautiful thing about this is that my mom narrates the commercial. I’m biased. (Hey, it IS my mom!) But I must say that her vocal variety was absolutely flawless. At one point in the TV spot, you hear her say, “Elexis, it does not matter what anyone says. You decide what you can do and no one else.”

You may think it’s a cliché but think about it. How many times have we allowed another person’s words to rule over our life? How many times have we let another person’s opinions validate us? How many times have we given someone else permission to make decisions on our behalf?

We must step away from giving others the power to validate us. The same people you allow to build you up will be the same ones who can tear you down. That very statement spoken by my mom is a compass that continues to guide my life daily.

There have been times in the past when I caught wind of outsiders questioning how a high school teacher could allow a blind student to run down a narrow runway and hurl himself through the air.

Yeah, at first, I thought it was crazy too. But I began to believe in my abilities even when the rest of the world didn’t. With every stride down the runway, and every jump into the sand pit, I realized my mom was right. I decide what I can do, and no one else.

What are you battling right now?

Whose inaccurate opinions are keeping you from leveling up in life?
I dare you to go after that job that someone said you could never get.

Were you told you’re not athletic at all?
I dare you to go out for that sports team anyway.

What do you mean you’ll never find a solution to the problem?
Just because someone tells you this, doesn’t make it true.

I dare you to live your life boldly and unapologetically. I challenge you to pursue your vision with everything in your being, and never stop until it has been achieved.

In the pursuit of your vision, remember my mom’s words. “It does not matter what anyone says. You decide what you can do, and no one else.”

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Lex Gillette is a professional keynote speaker, 4x Paralympic Medalist, and 3x Long Jump World Champion who is currently training to win gold at the 2020 Tokyo Paralympic Games. He has been wowing audiences of all sizes with his athletic gift since 2004, and he has been inspiring audiences on the corporate stage since 2013. His ultimate goal is to teach others to look past their current reality and challenge them to see further than they ever thought possible.

OF COURSE PEOPLE WHO ARE BLIND CAN HIKE!

Do you remember the first time you went hiking? Was it an easy trail, or one of the harder ones? Did you have to be very careful of loose rocks under your feet? Did you have to climb steep hills? Hiking can be challenging. Now, imagine yourself going on a hike without the ability to see. You’re blind. However, you have the verbal assistance of an AIRA agent to help you navigate along the path.

If you were wondering, AIRA is a company that uses smart glasses or your phone’s camera to provide verbal feedback on your surroundings. So, with the press of a button on my phone, I can be connected to a human agent who then has the ability to see where I am through the smart glasses or phone camera. That agent can then provide me with verbal feedback that helps me achieve virtually any task. On this day, I wanted to go on a hike on San Miguel Ranch, so I hit up AIRA, informed my agent on what I was wanting to do, and the next thing you know, we were on our way.

With the help of my agent Windell, I was able to climb over large rocks, lunge up steep hills, and weave back and forth along the trail. Although Windell’s voice was coming through my phone, I still felt as though he was right there with me as I climbed higher and higher up the mountain. Eventually, a flag came into view. I was almost to the top. I could feel it! After a few more paces, I stretched out my cane and tapped it against the flag pole. I did it! Here’s a six minute video of my journey up Mount San Miguel.

That is just one of the things that AIRA can help the blind and visually impaired community achieve. You can call up an agent and get help with reading your mail, going grocery shopping, exploring a museum, or playing corn hole. Do you want to take pictures that can be used on your social media platforms? AIRA agents can take screen shots and save them to your profile that can then be shared with others. The possibilities are endless! Here’s the thing, whenever I step onto the podium at a major competition, there’s a certain feeling that moves through my body. It’s a feeling of achievement, knowing that I accomplished the goal that I had in mind. That’s the same feeling I received when I made it to the top of that mountain. We all can’t be athletes, but we all can feel that sense of achievement. Our environment may change, but the feeling remains the same. Set out to conquer a task and see how amazing it feels to prevail, to accomplish, to achieve. It’s a feeling that you will want to experience over, and over, and over again. I promise you!

WORKOUT OVERVIEW FEBRUARY 2018

I want to win a gold medal at the Tokyo 2020 Paralympic Games for Team USA. It’s that simple. The vision is so strong that sometimes I literally space out and imagine someone placing the medal around my neck, handing me flowers, and raising that American flag high for all to see. The icing on the cake would be hearing the national anthem echo throughout the Paralympic stadium. That’s what I want, and that’s what I’m training to achieve. I understand that it’s not easy, but it’ll certainly be worth it in the end. Here’s a little peak of the work that I put in from the month of February. Enjoy!

SHOTS IN THE DARK

Nothing excites me more than a challenge. I love being faced with a task that forces me to think outside of the box, and develop strategies to accomplish a goal. After all, it’s through challenges that we are able to see what we’re capable of doing, and who we’re capable of becoming. With all that being said, although I’m a long jumper, I love trying other sports. Occasionally, I’ll grab a friend and we’ll head to the court and shoot baskets. Typically my friends will stand under the rim and yell to me to let me know where I should aim for the shot. It’s pretty similar to how Wesley calls me in the long jump. I’m listening to someone giving me an idea of where the rim is, and I have to focus on where that target might be. It’s a challenge, but I absolutely love it! View the video within this post to see how my latest trip to the court went.

 

 

 

The True Meaning of My Tagline

No Need for Sight When You Have a Vision® is a slogan that has been the driving force for my entire life. It was ten years ago when I actually created the mantra, and it was one that seemed to fit me perfectly, but what does it truly mean? Well I’m glad you asked. Let me tell you.

Many people automatically look to the elephant in the room. A person who is blind is able to still have a vision for success and live a prosperous and impactful life. yeah, that’s true, but my slogan is a message that speaks to more than just the blind community. It speaks to all.

“No Need for Sight” literally means that sight isn’t necessary. It doesn’t say “No Want for Sight”. I’ve been blind for almost 25 years now, and there are things that I “want” to see, but do I “need” to see those things in order to press forward in life? No. Needs and wants are two totally different things. “When You Have a Vision” speaks to a  bridge that connects us. What happens when you have a vision? You gain strength. You begin to see things for yourself, and those around you, that aren’t yet in existence. Your focus shifts, and you begin to see past your current reality. You become connected to so much more in life, and some of those connections will be to people and things that you would’ve never thought of in your wildest dreams.

So here it is. A vision is not meant to benefit you only. A true vision is meant to positively impact the lives of many. A real authentic vision will help create a community, and help transform the minds of everyone within that community. When you have a community, you’re able to compensate for those things that you personally may not have as someone will have your back. Most people will think that the overwhelming circumstances will weigh you down, but you will rise above them, because of the vision.

When people read, No Need for Sight When You Have a Vision®, they might initially believe that vision is what guides the path of the blind, but keep in mind that there are those who are identified medically as being blind, and there are those who walk around with their eyes wide open and still fail to see. Helen Keller once said “The only thing worse than being blind is having sight, and no vision.” So my slogan is a message for us all, a challenge for us all. Whether you’re battling with blindness literally, or battling with it figuratively, having a vision is the key. Can you see past your current reality, your current struggles, your current circumstances? Better yet, can you see past your current reality that may already be marked by success, and see even more great things off in the distance? Your sight may reveal to you images that you may not want to realize, but if you can think beyond the horizon, see beyond the horizon, then you have what it takes to transform your reality. That’s the power that lies in having a vision.

The Day I Met Jon Gordon

I was cycling through my Twitter timeline when a tweet popped up from Jon Gordon. The same Jon Gordon who has written titles like the Power of Positive Leadership, The Energy Bus, and the Carpenter. The same Jon Gordon who travels around the globe speaking to audiences on the power of positivity. Jon had tweeted something about walking on the streets of San Diego. I responded to him and said, “How long will you be in town? I want to meet you.” He replied to my tweet by saying he would be speaking at the Hard Rock Hotel and would finish at 5PM and head for the airport around 6:15PM or 6:30PM. Not really sure what sort of response I was expecting from that initial ask, but I was pretty stoked that he replied promptly and so positively. See what I did there?

I stay about 30 minutes from downtown, which is where the Hard Rock Hotel is located. it was 2:45PM or so. I still had some appointments in sports medicine that would take up the next hour. I kept asking myself, should I go? Something deep down inside told me that it would be stupid of you to not go and meet this guy. I want to positively impact the lives of people around the world, and Jon Gordon has been doing this for years. This is your chance to talk to, and learn from one of the best. Decision made.

I scurried out of sports medicine back to my room, showered, threw on some clothes, and called an Uber. Hard Rock Hotel, here we come! As we drove on the 805 north, I pondered the things that I wanted to ask. How did you become so successful? What steps did you take to get to this point in life? How can I impact more lives? So many things cycled in and out of my head. The car slowed to a stop at the destination, and I hopped out.

I stood on 5th avenue for a few minutes, and mapped out the plan in my head. Once inside the Hard Rock, I would find Jon, chat for a few minutes, and then head back home. Sounds easy enough. I whipped out my phone and called AIRA, an app that gives the blind and visually impaired real-time auditory assistance from a human agent who can see my surroundings through the phone’s camera. I was on my way. Using AIRA, I was able to cross the street and find the entrance to the Hard Rock. Now inside, I wasn’t sure where to go, but AIRA directed me to the front desk and I asked the gentleman behind the counter if he knew of any ballroom events that had just concluded. I really wanted to say, best-selling author and keynote speaker Jon Gordon and I had an exchange over Twitter and he told me to meet him here after his presentation, but I’m sure the gentleman would’ve gave me the craziest look known to man. That would’ve been a look that I wouldn’t have been able to see, but I know I would’ve felt it for sure. he responded by saying there were two events that started a couple hours ago, but he wasn’t exactly sure which room they were held in. Finally, he told me, “You can see if it’s down this hallway. Go straight that direction, turn right, and there’s a room toward that end of the hotel. If it isn’t there, try walking up the stairs and you’ll see a ballroom on that floor. If neither of those work, then I’m not sure where else it could possibly be.” So many great directions for a blind person: “You can see” if it’s down this hallway, and go straight “that direction”. I thanked him for his help while chuckling in my head. AIRA directed me down the hallway and instructed me to turn right. I heard no audible cues that would resemble an event. It was actually pretty quiet. I hit a u-turn and headed back toward the main lobby. AIRA then directed me to the stairwell that was to the right of the main entrance. I climbed the stairs, reached a landing, turned left and climbed another set of stairs. Once at the top, AIRA told me to scan my phone left and right. My assistant let me know that there was a ballroom not too far ahead. Would this be it? I approached the door and instantly recognized the sounds of plates being cleaned from tables, people standing around chatting, and others were leaving. I stepped inside and stood awkwardly trying to figure out who I could ask for help.

I heard a female voice from my lefthand side, but she was on the phone. As soon as she said good bye, I stepped in the direction that her voice had come from. She saw me and asked if I needed help with anything. “Is this the event where Jon Gordon was presenting? I’m supposed to meet him here after his presentation.” She said yes, asked me for my name, and directed me to a seat. I thanked AIRA and disconnected the call. About five minutes later, I felt the presence of someone walking up. The person sat down and their phone began to ring. “Hi, this is Jon Gordon.” Oh man, it’s him! He was sitting next to me. Jon let the caller know that he would need to give them a ring at another time. Jon said hello to me. I formally introduced myself and we began to have one of the best conversations. I’m assuming he had seen my Twitter profile as he asked me about the Paralympics, training, and life in general. I finally got to my question. As an aspiring speaker, how do I get to where you are? How do I get more speaking opportunities? His answer was very simple. Speak as much as possible. Leverage social media and let your followers know when and where you’ll be speaking. The more you speak, the better you’ll get. Jon then invited me to the restaurant downstairs. As we walked out, he asked if the elevator would be better. I replied that I had taken the stairs to get to the ballroom, and he sounded a little surprised. That made me think of the quote “There’s no elevator to success, you have to take the stairs.” We approached the top of the steps and I felt that he was a little hesitant. I confidently stepped forward down the stairs. The best way to ease a person’s nerves is to simply show them that everything is okay. I run stadiums for training so navigating the Hard Rock’s stairwell was a piece of cake. We made our way down the two flights of stairs and into the restaurant. We picked up the conversation where we left off. Jon then grabbed his phone and he recorded a short interview with me. He asked me about how I lost my sight, how did I overcome blindness, how did I get involved with the Paralympics, and what drives me. Had it not been for those questions, you would’ve thought Jon and I had known each other for years. Time seemed to run away from us, and shortly thereafter, we were in the lobby once again, this time to wait for his car to the airport. I thanked Jon for his time and wisdom. What blew my mind next is that he offered to exchange information. That’s a no-brainer. I took out my phone and that led to another conversation on how I use my phone. As I was ordering my Uber, I showed him how I navigate the different options and select the one that I want. Jon sent a text to my phone. I verified the number with him and he confirmed it was his digits. Boom! His car pulled up, we hugged, and went our separate ways.

As I stood there waiting for my Uber, I couldn’t help but be amazed. The last hour of my life was pretty doggone exciting. I met someone who has a huge impact in the lives of many, and he took time out of his busy schedule to meet with me. He gave me useful tips on how to become a better speaker. He shared the knowledge that he has gained during his career. The guy who speaks to us, and teaches us on the power of positivity, is the same man that I met. Jon Gordon lives out everything that he teaches on stage, and in his books. The craziest thing about this whole ordeal? Our meet up started from a simple ask on Twitter.