Posts tagged with "motivation"

Best

by Lex Gillette

While baseball is a game of averages and football is played 60 minutes at a time, the long jump really is broken down by one simple column on the leaderboard, “Best.”

“Best” is the distance of your longest jump that day. That’s it!

If the number you post in the Best column is higher than everybody else’s, you’ve won. It’s one of the things I love about my sport. You’re judged solely by your greatest work.

Recently, at the 2019 World Championships in Dubai, I came away with the gold medal and a Championship Record of 6.45 meters, a little over 21 feet. But I also had the second shortest jump of the competition. In fact, that was my first attempt. You want to talk about a rocky start. Sheesh!

But I knew, even after that terrible jump, that I still had an opportunity to put forth my best jump.

The Competition

In the long jump, you initially get three attempts. After your third attempt, the top eight marks move on to the final round, and the competitors with those marks receive three additional jumps.

Now, the interesting thing is that of the eight who make it to the final round, all jumps are a part of the decision-making process. If you had your best jump of the competition on your second attempt, and that just so happened to be the best jump out of the six, then that is still your best for the day.

Indeed, like the sports mentioned before, my best was THE best for the day. My second and third best jumps were the 10th and 11th best jumps, respectively. That terrible first jump? It was the 41st best jump of the day.

If we averaged my jumps, it was comparable to an eighth place finish when compared to the leader board. But in fact, my overall average was the sixth highest average of all contestants. If only the top eight competitors move on to the final round of the competition, and we had gone by average, I would have been in ninth place and headed for the airport at the end of the third round.

That’s all interesting speculation but it all comes down to this:

In Dubai, my best was enough for the gold medal.

“It’s amazing how often opportunity is disguised as hard work.”

I’ve found some variations on this quote, but this is the one I’ve always heard, and the long jump is the perfect expression of how I view opportunity.

Like I said above, for each competition, you are only judged by your best number. I’m very fortunate to have posted good numbers in many of those boxes. But here’s the thing.

That’s not by accident.

That’s not luck.

I worked for those opportunities. I perfected my timing. I determined the ideal number of steps in my run. I practiced my form, my reach and my landings. I did countless box jumps and sprints and cleans and squats. I showed up time and time again to be prepared for my opportunity in each and every competition.

When you put the work in, you will have more opportunities. There’s just no getting around it. And the more opportunities you take advantage of, the more you, and everyone else, will see how you get it done when it matters most.

When your best isn’t THE best

Winning a medal at the Paralympic Games, it takes dedication, it takes some commitment, it takes seriousness. It’s definitely not an environment made for messing around.

You have to go out there and compete to the best of your ability. You’re going against athletes from all over the world, and that medal means something. Getting on that podium, that means something for your country, for yourself, for your family. It’s an achievement. It’s a huge accomplishment.

At the Paralympic Games, the ultimate Paralympic competition, I have won a Silver Medal in 2004, 2008, 2012, and 2016. I’ve been to all the major international competitions since 2004, and I’ve won gold at every other competition.

Having the opportunity to go to Tokyo this year is very important to me. It’s a checkmark that I haven’t been able to put in that box yet. I want that opportunity. I want to know what that feeling is like, to stand at the top of the podium at the Paralympic Games with a Gold Medal around my neck and the ‘Star Spangled Banner’ playing over the loudspeakers.

Don’t get me wrong. I’m extremely proud of all four of those silver medals.

But I know I’d feel differently if I missed my gold medal opportunity because I didn’t prepare enough, or I didn’t apply myself. I didn’t train hard enough, or I didn’t do precisely what was outlined on the weight room regimen each day.

I know I’d be disappointed in myself if I ate junk food five or six times a week, didn’t fuel my body properly, or if I didn’t get enough sleep the night before a competition. Those would be things I could easily look back on and say, “Hey, I need to work on that” or “That’s why I don’t have Gold.”

But that’s not what happened. I put in the work. My best in those four competitions was, on average, five inches too short.

Am I okay with that? No. The competitor in me is going to Tokyo, my fifth Paralympic Games, and I’m getting gold. I’m continuing to put in the work for another opportunity to do that.

But can I live with that? Yes. But only because I know I put in the work, and I’ve taken advantage of my opportunities.

Incidentally, it helps that my lifetime best is the World Record 6.73 meters (22 feet, 1 inch). I know that in the entire history of the sport my best is THE BEST. (World Records deserve all caps. Don’t you think?)

But it all comes back to that simple principle of the long jump, rewarding our best efforts. Oftentimes our biggest wins in life are less about our averages than it is about putting forth our best effort when opportunity presents itself. So, put in the work, create those opportunities, and give it your best.

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Lex Gillette is a professional keynote speaker, 4x Paralympic Medalist, and 4x Long Jump World Champion who is currently training to win gold at the 2020 Tokyo Paralympic Games. He has been wowing audiences of all sizes with his athletic gift since 2004, and he has been inspiring audiences on the corporate stage since 2013. His ultimate goal is to teach others to look past their current reality and challenge them to see further than they ever thought possible.


Photo credits: Lex long jump picture by Joe Kusumoto; Dubai by the Numbers infographic created by EtterOps using Canva

Live Forever

by Lex Gillette

“The goal isn’t to live forever; it is to create something that will.”

– Chuck Palahniuk

This is one of my favorite quotes, and one that guides my actions every day. In order to leave a lasting impact on this earth, you must travel along the path, bringing others along with you as you move forward.

It does no good if I win gold in the 2020 Tokyo Paralympic Games and not share with an up-and-coming athlete the best practices that will aid their athletic success. Team USA will be around long after I’m done with the sport. It’s only right to help develop new talent so that our country can continue to be successful for years to come.

I have a lot to offer up-and-coming athletes when it comes to training, competing, and (of course) vision.

But beyond that, I am a lesson in longevity and perseverance. I’ve medaled in four Paralympic games, and I am now training for my fifth. At the age of 35, I’ve just brought home my fourth consecutive world championship and set a new championship-record distance of 6.45 meters (a little over 21 feet for those who are metrically-challenged). And I am still the world record holder in the long jump in my category.

Let’s just say, I’ve been around the block.

A pinch of reality and a dash of humility

Oftentimes, highly successful athletes are insecure. It seems they’re afraid that if their “secret to success” gets out, someone else will come along and take their crown.

Listen, just because I give you the recipe, doesn’t guarantee the food is going to taste the same as when I cook it. And if you do improve on it, if it does taste better, I hope you plan on sharing some with me!

Athletes are bigger, stronger, and faster than ever before. At the Paralympic World Championships in Dubai last week, there were a total of 43 new world records that were set. 43!

Eventually, my world record will fall, but how great of a legacy will I have if I help usher in the new generation of American long jumpers to break that record?

It would mean a lot to the visually impaired who are inspired to try new things. It would mean a lot to me, to know that I can continue to give back to the sport that’s given me the world, even when my jumping days are done.

Champions are champions because they understand that building well-rounded people is much more important than building individual success.

Champions are champions because they recognize that to help others allows a greater number of people to thrive and operate on a grander scale.

Champions are champions because they understand that legacy has no expiration date. It will live forever.

Lead by example

So, get out there and compose new music that ignites inspiration. Write a book of life lessons geared toward building human beings who value character over currency. Create an after-school program to foster academic excellence in students living in underserved areas. Or simply offer someone an uplifting word they can latch on to as they navigate this crazy world.

Some things are here today and gone tomorrow, but it doesn’t have to be this way. I challenge you to find that one thing that will live forever, and ever, and ever.

___________

Lex Gillette is a professional keynote speaker, 4x Paralympic Medalist, and 3x Long Jump World Champion who is currently training to win gold at the 2020 Tokyo Paralympic Games. He has been wowing audiences of all sizes with his athletic gift since 2004, and he has been inspiring audiences on the corporate stage since 2013. His ultimate goal is to teach others to look past their current reality and challenge them to see further than they ever thought possible.


Photo credits: Infinity symbol by 463259 on Pixabay; Lex Legacy image by Joris Debeij

So Fortunate

by Lex Gillette

As I sat on the bench outside a building in the Paralympic village, I listened to an African athlete speak of his family and hometown. I was absolutely astonished to hear what his day-to-day life was like back home.

We are undoubtedly aware that there are places that don’t have the luxury of vehicles, television, and computers, but actually meeting someone who lives so simply and talking to him about his experiences is incredible.

We both spoke of our joy in competing at the Paralympic Games for our family and countries, but his situation was a bit different. How he finished in his events would dictate not only his future but the future of his entire family.

If he were to win, he guaranteed the necessary funds for food and clean drinking water for his family. The only substantial lifestyle change my finish would dictate is what sort of vacation I’d go on after the competition.

I shudder to think of what a poor finish might do for an athlete in a similar situation to his, but I am extremely thankful that I spoke to him. Hearing his experiences cemented one thing in my mind. I am so fortunate.

Do you want fries with that?

Walking into the cafeteria to eat dinner, all I could think of was the coming meal. I had been in the Netherlands for a week prior to the games, and there was no change in the food. We had eaten the same thing every day.

While my team and I talked about the foods we missed and wished for a better dinner, I listened to the athletes around us. I heard cheerful voices and words of gratitude. Yep, you guessed right. Many of them were happy to even be getting a meal.

As I sat there, I was overwhelmed by realizing how powerful a thing it is to have the option of ‘deciding’ what I want to eat every day. Many people around the world live without this privilege and count themselves lucky just to be eating.

Listening to their appreciation for even a simple meal recalled my earlier conversation with the African athlete. On average, our experience here in the United States is so different. Just knowing this, you have to realize that you and I are so fortunate.

Being an athlete

When you compete around the world, you realize that being an athlete isn’t just about jumping further, scoring goals, or winning races. Being an athlete is about learning.

Every time I’ve stepped outside the country in my 16 years of international competition, I learn about others. Through their stories and their experiences, I learn more about myself. The common denominator in this whole equation is how fortunate I feel to live the life I do.

The simple joys of life

Several international competitions have had less than ideal lodgings, and I have traveled to a few countries where the food wasn’t the greatest or might have been outside my comfort zone. (Did you know they eat guinnea pigs in South America? I hear they’re delicious, but I can’t see myself eating one.)

Many of the athletes from other countries were ecstatic to experience simple meals and a roof over their heads. They reveled in what we take for granted every day.

I’ve met a handful of athletes who were desperate to win a medal and ensure financial support for their family and friends. I’ve met athletes who are totally satisfied with a life free from electronics, the internet, and other distractions. I’ve had conversations with people who live life on the simplest of terms.

These are the sorts of things that I encounter when I travel which is why I love it so much. I meet true athletes, I meet people who really know what it means to live life, and I am constantly reminded of how blessed we are.

We are so fortunate.

___________

Lex Gillette is a professional keynote speaker, 4x Paralympic Medalist, and 3x Long Jump World Champion who is currently training to win gold at the 2020 Tokyo Paralympic Games. He has been wowing audiences of all sizes with his athletic gift since 2004, and he has been inspiring audiences on the corporate stage since 2013. His ultimate goal is to teach others to look past their current reality and challenge them to see further than they ever thought possible.


Photo credits: B&W photo of Lex by Joris Debeij; Long Jump image by Joe Kusumoto

How to Deliver When It Matters Most

By Lex Gillette

Be a rockYou’ve heard the phrase before, “Say what you’ll do and do what you say.” This is how you become reliable. When you’re reliable you can be trusted. When you can be trusted, people believe that you will deliver when it counts.

There’s a common sports phrase, “clutch time.” It means that when time is of the essence, and the game is on the line, you need someone to produce results. Outside of sports, you still want to foster that reputation for getting it done and avoiding the “unreliable” crown. Here are three things that will help you establish your reputation as reliable and trustworthy.

Be 100% sure you can deliver

Think about this. You plant a bunch of apple seeds in the soil. You water and care for them. A tree springs up from the ground and grows. Eventually, you walk outside to pluck one of the fruits only to realize that there are oranges hanging from the tree limbs, not apples.

That’s crazy! We should be able to trust an apple seed. It has one purpose: to fulfill the promise that when we put it into the ground, it will eventually bear apples for us to eat.

You need to be 100% sure you can deliver on what you promise.

For example, let me ask:

  • Knowing that you promised friends you would go to the movies with them that night, would you tell your co-workers that you’d stay late and help complete a project due the next morning?
  • Would you tell your boss you will write up a new proposal by close of business that day knowing that you have to pick up a family member at the airport at 3 PM?
  • Would you promise your partner a date night knowing that your rec league soccer game ends just a few minutes before you’re supposed to pick them up?

Your answer for all of these should be a resounding “No.” Particularly if you want your partner to stay your partner. (Sheesh! Do you have a death wish?)

Listen, don’t make promises you can’t keep. People expect you to produce the fruit you say you will bear.

Say “No”

Honestly, I feel like I’m coaching myself right now. I have a very hard time saying no.

If you’re like me, we get into these moments where anything seems possible. We really, sincerely want to help and say yes to everything.

  • Yes, I can help you do that.
  • Sure, I’ll meet you for coffee.
  • I absolutely have time to help you get that done.

Nine times out of ten, any single one of these requests is a small thing. But we say yes to so much that our schedules get weighed down with the promises we’ve made. We feel the stress of getting things done for other people as well as the stress to accomplish our own tasks.

Repeat after me – “No.”
Felt good, didn’t it?

It’s okay to say no. If you walk away from this post with no other insight, please remember to use this word. It will save both you and the person you’ve made promises to.

You’re saved because you’re not stressed or in a time crunch from the additional items that overwhelm your workload. They’re saved from your inability to put in the appropriate amount of time and effort required to satisfy your promise.

Saying no doesn’t always mean never. It can mean not yet. Circle back to the people who seek your help or offer them another time to check in with you. At a later date or time, you may be able to give a confident yes.

When you’re 100% sure you can deliver, you give your complete attention to the task and their needs. Saying no when you can’t do something will reflect far more positively on you than saying yes. Use the word.

Be honest

If you can’t do it, say so. Often people want to be everything to everybody. That’s just not possible. Nobody can be a master of all. I’ve tried. (See section on saying “No.”)

In my experience, you’ll be far more appreciated if you can stand there and say:

  • “I can’t help you because I know nothing about calculus.”
  • “I’m really not comfortable talking to you about those things, and I don’t want to be a part of that conversation.”
  • “I appreciate what you’re trying to do. But I don’t have the bandwidth to help right now, and I don’t know when I will.”

Some say that honesty is the best policy, but I heard Dr. Myles Munroe say, “Honesty is the only policy.” He contends that if you say, “the best policy,” you’re implying there are other options to choose from.

There is no better option when you’re faced with a request for help. Choose to be honest. Honesty can never undermine trust.

Don’t promise things that you can’t deliver, learn to say no, and be honest. If you follow these three rules, you will put forth your best effort in any aid you offer. That means you’ll have people calling on you because they know you’re reliable, trusted, and can deliver when it matters most.

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Lex Gillette is a professional keynote speaker, 4x Paralympic Medalist, and 3x Long Jump World Champion who is currently training to win gold at the 2020 Tokyo Paralympic Games. He has been wowing audiences of all sizes with his athletic gift since 2004, and he has been inspiring audiences on the corporate stage since 2013. His ultimate goal is to teach others to look past their current reality and challenge them to see further than they ever thought possible.


Photo of Lex and Wes Williams by Joe Kusumoto.

FIND YOUR WINGS

by Lex Gillette

One of my first jobs was as a DJ for a local radio station back in North Carolina. I was one of the youngest people to ever get on the airwaves. I was around 10 years old or so, and my 12-year-old cousin, Calvin, also known in our family as Chubby, was my co-host.

We played all the top hip-hop and R&B hits from artists like Boyz II Men, Notorious BIG, 112, Outkast, Mariah Carey, and Snoop Dogg. We even had prize packs for callers who would ring in to answer music trivia. With all this activity, we had to have commercial breaks to pay the bills, but we did our best to keep those short so we wouldn’t lose listeners.

It’s funny how two young kids could take on this type of job. Well, we weren’t technically employed. We weren’t even being broadcast anywhere, but you couldn’t tell us any different. We had an old tape player, some blank cassette tapes, and we would record our favorite songs from the radio.

If you grew up in the 90s, you probably know about tape players. You press the two buttons together and the machine would record. In between our recorded songs, Chubby and I cracked jokes or pretended to be callers dialing in for music trivia. To us, we were the best voices on the air. Talk about good times. Imagination is bliss.

A great imagination allows you to go places and do things without limits or expectations. At the time, Chubby and I were probably doing something that most people wouldn’t expect. Our imaginations ran wild.

You have no idea of what is possible until you allow imagination to take the reins. As we get older, most people begin to move away from imagination. “Why indulge in something that isn’t real?” they ask. “That’s not realistic,” they add. “You’re dreaming,” they say, swatting away your imagination with the palm of their hand.

To those naysayers, I’d like to say, “That’s right. Chubby and I were dreaming big.”

My years of being a DJ did so much for me. It fostered my love of music. It gave me time with my older cousin. It fed my confidence, gave me a stage, and let me know I could craft my imagination into something real.

Imagination colors the experiences of our everyday lives, but it also gives us the vision for change and innovation. I’d loved to have been the person who thought:

  • “Hey, this tape machine is big and bulky. How about we think of an option that is smaller that can produce the same outcome?”
  • “Hey, this cassette tape is only 60 minutes long. How about we figure out an option that extends our recording time?”
  • Or better yet, “Hey, let’s figure out a way to get our radio show from the cassette tape onto the computer.”

(If I had figured that last one out, I would have been invited to give my TED Talk ten years earlier!)

I understand there are many, many moments when we need to think realistically. However, the realm of non-reality reintroduces us to a land where imagination is the spoken language and creativity is currency.

Muhammad Ali once said, “The man who has no imagination has no wings.” It’s okay to step away from reality and bask in the rays of imagination. To move forward and redefine the possible, you need to spend some time in your imagination. That is where ideas are born. That is where you find your wings.

You can go places and do things no one would expect. Just cling to imagination. Now fly!

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Lex Gillette is a professional keynote speaker, 4x Paralympic Medalist, and 3x Long Jump World Champion who is currently training to win gold at the 2020 Tokyo Paralympic Games. He has been wowing audiences of all sizes with his athletic gift since 2004, and he has been inspiring audiences on the corporate stage since 2013. His ultimate goal is to teach others to look past their current reality and challenge them to see further than they ever thought possible.


Photo credit: Lex with arms spread by by Alex Ingram, Art is Being.

WORKOUT OVERVIEW FEBRUARY 2018

I want to win a gold medal at the Tokyo 2020 Paralympic Games for Team USA. It’s that simple. The vision is so strong that sometimes I literally space out and imagine someone placing the medal around my neck, handing me flowers, and raising that American flag high for all to see. The icing on the cake would be hearing the national anthem echo throughout the Paralympic stadium. That’s what I want, and that’s what I’m training to achieve. I understand that it’s not easy, but it’ll certainly be worth it in the end. Here’s a little peak of the work that I put in from the month of February. Enjoy!

SHOTS IN THE DARK

Nothing excites me more than a challenge. I love being faced with a task that forces me to think outside of the box, and develop strategies to accomplish a goal. After all, it’s through challenges that we are able to see what we’re capable of doing, and who we’re capable of becoming. With all that being said, although I’m a long jumper, I love trying other sports. Occasionally, I’ll grab a friend and we’ll head to the court and shoot baskets. Typically my friends will stand under the rim and yell to me to let me know where I should aim for the shot. It’s pretty similar to how Wesley calls me in the long jump. I’m listening to someone giving me an idea of where the rim is, and I have to focus on where that target might be. It’s a challenge, but I absolutely love it! View the video within this post to see how my latest trip to the court went.

 

 

 

The True Meaning of My Tagline

No Need for Sight When You Have a Vision® is a slogan that has been the driving force for my entire life. It was ten years ago when I actually created the mantra, and it was one that seemed to fit me perfectly, but what does it truly mean? Well I’m glad you asked. Let me tell you.

Many people automatically look to the elephant in the room. A person who is blind is able to still have a vision for success and live a prosperous and impactful life. yeah, that’s true, but my slogan is a message that speaks to more than just the blind community. It speaks to all.

“No Need for Sight” literally means that sight isn’t necessary. It doesn’t say “No Want for Sight”. I’ve been blind for almost 25 years now, and there are things that I “want” to see, but do I “need” to see those things in order to press forward in life? No. Needs and wants are two totally different things. “When You Have a Vision” speaks to a  bridge that connects us. What happens when you have a vision? You gain strength. You begin to see things for yourself, and those around you, that aren’t yet in existence. Your focus shifts, and you begin to see past your current reality. You become connected to so much more in life, and some of those connections will be to people and things that you would’ve never thought of in your wildest dreams.

So here it is. A vision is not meant to benefit you only. A true vision is meant to positively impact the lives of many. A real authentic vision will help create a community, and help transform the minds of everyone within that community. When you have a community, you’re able to compensate for those things that you personally may not have as someone will have your back. Most people will think that the overwhelming circumstances will weigh you down, but you will rise above them, because of the vision.

When people read, No Need for Sight When You Have a Vision®, they might initially believe that vision is what guides the path of the blind, but keep in mind that there are those who are identified medically as being blind, and there are those who walk around with their eyes wide open and still fail to see. Helen Keller once said “The only thing worse than being blind is having sight, and no vision.” So my slogan is a message for us all, a challenge for us all. Whether you’re battling with blindness literally, or battling with it figuratively, having a vision is the key. Can you see past your current reality, your current struggles, your current circumstances? Better yet, can you see past your current reality that may already be marked by success, and see even more great things off in the distance? Your sight may reveal to you images that you may not want to realize, but if you can think beyond the horizon, see beyond the horizon, then you have what it takes to transform your reality. That’s the power that lies in having a vision.

The Day I Met Jon Gordon

I was cycling through my Twitter timeline when a tweet popped up from Jon Gordon. The same Jon Gordon who has written titles like the Power of Positive Leadership, The Energy Bus, and the Carpenter. The same Jon Gordon who travels around the globe speaking to audiences on the power of positivity. Jon had tweeted something about walking on the streets of San Diego. I responded to him and said, “How long will you be in town? I want to meet you.” He replied to my tweet by saying he would be speaking at the Hard Rock Hotel and would finish at 5PM and head for the airport around 6:15PM or 6:30PM. Not really sure what sort of response I was expecting from that initial ask, but I was pretty stoked that he replied promptly and so positively. See what I did there?

I stay about 30 minutes from downtown, which is where the Hard Rock Hotel is located. it was 2:45PM or so. I still had some appointments in sports medicine that would take up the next hour. I kept asking myself, should I go? Something deep down inside told me that it would be stupid of you to not go and meet this guy. I want to positively impact the lives of people around the world, and Jon Gordon has been doing this for years. This is your chance to talk to, and learn from one of the best. Decision made.

I scurried out of sports medicine back to my room, showered, threw on some clothes, and called an Uber. Hard Rock Hotel, here we come! As we drove on the 805 north, I pondered the things that I wanted to ask. How did you become so successful? What steps did you take to get to this point in life? How can I impact more lives? So many things cycled in and out of my head. The car slowed to a stop at the destination, and I hopped out.

I stood on 5th avenue for a few minutes, and mapped out the plan in my head. Once inside the Hard Rock, I would find Jon, chat for a few minutes, and then head back home. Sounds easy enough. I whipped out my phone and called AIRA, an app that gives the blind and visually impaired real-time auditory assistance from a human agent who can see my surroundings through the phone’s camera. I was on my way. Using AIRA, I was able to cross the street and find the entrance to the Hard Rock. Now inside, I wasn’t sure where to go, but AIRA directed me to the front desk and I asked the gentleman behind the counter if he knew of any ballroom events that had just concluded. I really wanted to say, best-selling author and keynote speaker Jon Gordon and I had an exchange over Twitter and he told me to meet him here after his presentation, but I’m sure the gentleman would’ve gave me the craziest look known to man. That would’ve been a look that I wouldn’t have been able to see, but I know I would’ve felt it for sure. he responded by saying there were two events that started a couple hours ago, but he wasn’t exactly sure which room they were held in. Finally, he told me, “You can see if it’s down this hallway. Go straight that direction, turn right, and there’s a room toward that end of the hotel. If it isn’t there, try walking up the stairs and you’ll see a ballroom on that floor. If neither of those work, then I’m not sure where else it could possibly be.” So many great directions for a blind person: “You can see” if it’s down this hallway, and go straight “that direction”. I thanked him for his help while chuckling in my head. AIRA directed me down the hallway and instructed me to turn right. I heard no audible cues that would resemble an event. It was actually pretty quiet. I hit a u-turn and headed back toward the main lobby. AIRA then directed me to the stairwell that was to the right of the main entrance. I climbed the stairs, reached a landing, turned left and climbed another set of stairs. Once at the top, AIRA told me to scan my phone left and right. My assistant let me know that there was a ballroom not too far ahead. Would this be it? I approached the door and instantly recognized the sounds of plates being cleaned from tables, people standing around chatting, and others were leaving. I stepped inside and stood awkwardly trying to figure out who I could ask for help.

I heard a female voice from my lefthand side, but she was on the phone. As soon as she said good bye, I stepped in the direction that her voice had come from. She saw me and asked if I needed help with anything. “Is this the event where Jon Gordon was presenting? I’m supposed to meet him here after his presentation.” She said yes, asked me for my name, and directed me to a seat. I thanked AIRA and disconnected the call. About five minutes later, I felt the presence of someone walking up. The person sat down and their phone began to ring. “Hi, this is Jon Gordon.” Oh man, it’s him! He was sitting next to me. Jon let the caller know that he would need to give them a ring at another time. Jon said hello to me. I formally introduced myself and we began to have one of the best conversations. I’m assuming he had seen my Twitter profile as he asked me about the Paralympics, training, and life in general. I finally got to my question. As an aspiring speaker, how do I get to where you are? How do I get more speaking opportunities? His answer was very simple. Speak as much as possible. Leverage social media and let your followers know when and where you’ll be speaking. The more you speak, the better you’ll get. Jon then invited me to the restaurant downstairs. As we walked out, he asked if the elevator would be better. I replied that I had taken the stairs to get to the ballroom, and he sounded a little surprised. That made me think of the quote “There’s no elevator to success, you have to take the stairs.” We approached the top of the steps and I felt that he was a little hesitant. I confidently stepped forward down the stairs. The best way to ease a person’s nerves is to simply show them that everything is okay. I run stadiums for training so navigating the Hard Rock’s stairwell was a piece of cake. We made our way down the two flights of stairs and into the restaurant. We picked up the conversation where we left off. Jon then grabbed his phone and he recorded a short interview with me. He asked me about how I lost my sight, how did I overcome blindness, how did I get involved with the Paralympics, and what drives me. Had it not been for those questions, you would’ve thought Jon and I had known each other for years. Time seemed to run away from us, and shortly thereafter, we were in the lobby once again, this time to wait for his car to the airport. I thanked Jon for his time and wisdom. What blew my mind next is that he offered to exchange information. That’s a no-brainer. I took out my phone and that led to another conversation on how I use my phone. As I was ordering my Uber, I showed him how I navigate the different options and select the one that I want. Jon sent a text to my phone. I verified the number with him and he confirmed it was his digits. Boom! His car pulled up, we hugged, and went our separate ways.

As I stood there waiting for my Uber, I couldn’t help but be amazed. The last hour of my life was pretty doggone exciting. I met someone who has a huge impact in the lives of many, and he took time out of his busy schedule to meet with me. He gave me useful tips on how to become a better speaker. He shared the knowledge that he has gained during his career. The guy who speaks to us, and teaches us on the power of positivity, is the same man that I met. Jon Gordon lives out everything that he teaches on stage, and in his books. The craziest thing about this whole ordeal? Our meet up started from a simple ask on Twitter.